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  1. #1
    My CNC experience is related to plasma cutting and more recently my mini-mill which so far has only been used to cut profiles from flat sheet and put holes etc in them as needed. I use Aspire or SheetCam for the CAM.

    I am now converting my Bridgeport to CNC to expand my possibilities, all 3 axes will be controlled.

    I need to make some parts for the Z axis drive and these can be done on my mini-mill which is handy as the Bridgeport is in 1000 pieces at present ;)

    However, with my limited 2D knowledge so far, it was not until started modifying the drawings which were kindly sent to me by a previous converter that i realised how little I know about making the file for a 3D part

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The picture shows various views of it, it has features on front and back, holes, a large slot etc.

    I know pocketing, contouring etc but what is the missing link here?

    My guess was to machine all the front details, holes and the outside first from a larger lump of plate, this would give me a part with the edges to size and one side finished.

    Then, flip over, pick up my X & Y datum from whatever corner I use, and machine the back face - this is where I hit the knowledge gap - do I remove the outline (it's finished) and convert the features needed (a T-shaped slot) into full outlines on their own or something else??

    I have never seen any other CAD source and my 2D stuff seems very simple compared so???

  2. #2
    I am as new as you at this but in fusion I would create front as required and then copy that whole object flip 180 deg and add back detail to second copy.

    Then use blocks fixed on bed to ensure accurate placement when flipping before starting to machine the reverse after contour cut before removing piece adding blocks for placement.

    2 single 2d operations on one part if that makes sense.

  3. #3
    Yes, but the paths for the reverse - do these have to be just the T-shape pocket required

    i.e. the front would be the whole object and the back would look just like a large T shape with no outline at all?

  4. #4
    Yes only cut the slot and contour once then flip to machine only what could not be machined from front, so back would just be a T shaped pocket to required depth. I would start from same corner point on second setup but on other side of material obviously. Although placement may be easier to cut slot and T Pocket and holes first and then flip to cut remaining front using holes and pockets to fix back down.
    Last edited by lucan07; 01-06-2016 at 11:49 AM.

  5. #5
    The slot is pretty wide so i would position the material to place the eventual slot over a run of bed holes, machine the slot plus the two small ovals, then fit clamps into the slot and finish the rest of the front.

    As you said, then place blocks on bed touching the finished edge, flip over, clamp around the edge and machine the pocket T.

    Seems to make sense now, will finish the drawings and do a simulation or two :)

    Thanks
    Last edited by Davek0974; 01-06-2016 at 11:59 AM.

  6. #6
    A little more gap to fill...

    How do you program an edge chamfer or break an edge in CNC??

    I have Aspire but no idea on this one?

    I would guess at using a 45deg tool but is there a method to offset the correct amount and set the depth?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Davek0974 View Post
    A little more gap to fill...

    How do you program an edge chamfer or break an edge in CNC??

    I have Aspire but no idea on this one?

    I would guess at using a 45deg tool but is there a method to offset the correct amount and set the depth?
    The Cam software will most likely have Chamfer toolpath which will give parameters such as chamfer length then take the tool size/angle and do the offset for you.

    If not then it's bit of math for depth/length which I've no clue about and setting an offset. To save my brain I just use Cad to show me how deep/offset etc.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Davek0974 View Post
    A little more gap to fill...

    How do you program an edge chamfer or break an edge in CNC??

    I have Aspire but no idea on this one?

    I would guess at using a 45deg tool but is there a method to offset the correct amount and set the depth?
    I am no expert by any stretch of the imagination, and I also struggled with this one ! What I ended up doing was just a case of simple maths, taking your 45deg cutter, You could assume that 0, 0, 0, puts the tip of the cutter right on the edge of your part, I then just told mach3 that I was using a 4mm cutter (doesn`t matter what size you insert here as long as it corresponds with your depth of cut) and used a cutting depth of 2.5mm. This in turn would put a .5 chamfer (in my case just a regular countersink) right round the edge of your part. If you required a larger chamfer, then simply lower the cutter to a depth of 3mm. Hope you can understand what I`m trying to say here

  9. #9
    Only do this in Fusion but just use a 2d chamfer and select a chamfer mill to suit.
    Last edited by lucan07; 07-06-2016 at 08:40 PM.

  10. #10
    Thanks all, seems this function is a downloadable option for Aspire but as I'm running an older version of the software it's not available for me, oh well, looks like i'll be needing that math knowledge I didn't learn at school again....


    :)

    Yes the explanations make sense and I have an idea now of what to try.

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