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  1. #11
    Hi Dave,

    Just knocked this together to help work it out.

    You can use one of the 3 look up tables depending on if the chamfer tool is 90, 60, or 45 deg.

    Then assuming you use a notional tool diameter of 4mm as suggested above by needleworks in the CAM tool definition, then you just need to look up the required chamfer distance you require (C) and read off the depth of cut required (P) and enter this value into the CAM software.

    I've not tried this out but I think it is OK. Please check on a scrap piece first (!).

    Any errors spotted by anyone let me know . . .

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Building a CNC machine to make a better one since 2010 . . .
    MK1 (1st photo), MK2, MK3, MK4

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  3. #12
    Maybe install fusion and only use it for your first hundred thou, cut the bevels in april before your turnover too high, or just set up all your regular jobs requiring bevels on 30day trial.
    Last edited by lucan07; 07-06-2016 at 09:48 PM.

  4. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by lucan07 View Post
    Maybe install fusion and only use it for your first hundred thou, cut the bevels in april before your turnover too high, or just set up all your regular jobs requiring bevels on 30day trial.
    I tried Fusion360, couldn't figure it out at all, Aspire I can grasp, SheetCam is easy :)

  5. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by routercnc View Post
    Hi Dave,

    Just knocked this together to help work it out.

    You can use one of the 3 look up tables depending on if the chamfer tool is 90, 60, or 45 deg.

    Then assuming you use a notional tool diameter of 4mm as suggested above by needleworks in the CAM tool definition, then you just need to look up the required chamfer distance you require (C) and read off the depth of cut required (P) and enter this value into the CAM software.

    I've not tried this out but I think it is OK. Please check on a scrap piece first (!).

    Any errors spotted by anyone let me know . . .

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	chamfer_formula.jpg 
Views:	102 
Size:	224.6 KB 
ID:	18590
    Yes, that explains it a lot clearer mate I should also have said that I use cambam for my toolpaths (not mach3 as I said in my previous post) like many, I just can`t get to grips with fusion 360 cause it always seems to mess up somewhere.

  6. #15
    Looking for suggestions on how to do the CAM for a part i make batches of manually at present, it's a round shaft with a square peg on the end. I have the vise mounted usually in one place for long periods so a G5x offset seems good, I can ref off the fixed jaw front and end.

    It's not shown in my sketch but the radius of the tool is used to create a radius at the point where the square peg meets the body - just run the tool in from the end.

    The part is held in a square 5C collet block at a fixed depth, the vice is fitted with an end-stop so pretty much all settings are repeatable and fixed.

    I am looking to machine two sides and the end, rotate the block 90deg and re-run.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Just looking for ideas :)

  7. #16
    In all honesty, I wouldn't bother with CAM.

    I'd probably hand code using work offsets. Use a reference point (i.e. touch of end of material, then touch of the side) to zero the work piece coordinates, then hand code based of that.

    At most I'd use the Mach wizards to generate the code for each side, if multiple passes on each side is needed.
    Avoiding the rubbish customer service from AluminiumWarehouse since July '13.

  8. #17
    Hmm, thats a leap forward, not hand-coded anything yet ;)

    Once the refs are made - end for X and centre of rod for Y, i can see saving them as offsets - they will not change unless the vise is moved which does not happen too often. So i just need to figure the path out i guess.

    The manual ones i cut in one pass, its a little heavy on the tool but works ok, with automation i would likely use two passes as the steel is harder than plain mild.

  9. #18
    Why not do them vertically then you wouldn't have to move them.
    If you want the radius use a round nose cutter.

    Peter

  10. #19
    Thats an interesting thought, thanks.

    Cutting forces would be harder to resist but not impossible, I have a 5C collet holder with vertical/horizontal bolt-down base, could use that if it grips well enough.

    Will need to test this when i get her running :)

  11. #20
    Ok, next thing :)

    How can i pick up an edge without a working edge-finder?

    I tried today using my normal edge-finder but that likes to run at about 800rpm and the mini-mill does not go below 1000. Also it does not have a spindle-toggle button (yet) so i tried an MDI of M03-s1000 which works of course but then you cant jog the axis as it on the MDI line, moving off the MDI seems to upset the speed control which then starts wandering all over the place.

    Maybe i'm missing something here?

    For this job a simple pointed probe worked but the next part I have needs machining both sides accurately so i need a way to pick up the reverse spot-on.

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