Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Oh so your YES man well tough luck because if it's shit you'll get told it's shit by me.! . . . . Like wise if it's good I'll say so as well but I see nothing here that's good.!

    To be fair I've been very kind on what I've commented so far, mainly because not got full week spare to list all that's bad.!



    Nothing to do with shaping and every thing to do with being warped and surfaces not on same plane. Then generally just weak poor rough arsed engineering which for CNC won't cut it.
    Just because your using steel doesn't mean it's stronger. If the design is weak and poorly built which this is then doesn't matter if built from 2" steel material or 0.1" aluminum (note Ref in American just to so can understand . .lol) you'll never succeed in achieving accuracy or reliabilty.

    Look again at this Pic for just few bits of whats wrong.!

    Attachment 20111
    I dont see how that section is relevant to the outer edge. It is on the inside of that weld?

    Considering you sound a bit jaded and have really offered no constructive advice whatsoever (which I find strange from a person who appears to be a guru on this site.) I would appreciate it for mine and the others sake not commenting just saying "this is bad.. all bad.. but I wont say why cause the list is too long and my bollocks are itchy. Whinge whinge" If it's so bad, dont comment OR do as the wise do and wait until I say "whoops, made a mistake." Then pipe up accordingly.

    Anyway, I'm sure that in ever experienced CNC loving life of yours you can stifle your vomit long enough to calmy ask questions and then make assumptions.

    Sincerely, non American but in fact Australian novice CNC builder. :)

    Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

  2. #42
    Hi Dave,

    I think what most people are going on about here is that you've used flat and angle without any sort of machining (not that I've seen mention of in your thread?) to make the surfaces true to either themselves or mating surfaces. Angle (as I'm sure you knowand have found out) is nearly always under or over 90 and the surface is never flat, certainly not the inner surface where you've mounted your Z axis bearings. This will lead to binding (your video unfortunately shows or proves nothing about how smooth the Z axis is just that you can turn the ballscrew and it moves, sorry) and premature wear of the bearings which will lead to a sloppy Z axis and inaccuracy. Jazz is being harsh (but perfectly fair) in his remarks, it's the way he is and he tells it like it is without any BS, he is one of (if not the) the most helpful and knowledgeable people on this forum and his comments are worth listening to, even if you don't like them.

    If you'd welded your Z axis and then had it machined so the bearing blocks could sit square, flat and true, and had the ballscrew mounting section machined flat/square and where the spindle is going to mount machined square to everything else then all this would be immaterial, but there's no way in hell that all this is going to be square with just plain welded steel. Yes you'll be able to use the machine but at what accuracy (you may not need much accuracy so this is all immaterial) and how long before the bearings wear and it all become loose and sloppy? The spindle will require lots of shimming to get it perpendicular but if your rails aren't straight/parallel and true then it'll still not cut accurately. How have you trammed the rails so they're parallel to each other, what equipment do you have (DTI's, levels, straight edges etc.) to check for straightness, parallelness etc?

    Whatever the outcome good luck with your build and I'm looking forward to seeing the first chips coming off this
    Neil...

    Build log...here

  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by njhussey View Post
    Hi Dave,

    I think what most people are going on about here is that you've used flat and angle without any sort of machining (not that I've seen mention of in your thread?) to make the surfaces true to either themselves or mating surfaces. Angle (as I'm sure you knowand have found out) is nearly always under or over 90 and the surface is never flat, certainly not the inner surface where you've mounted your Z axis bearings. This will lead to binding (your video unfortunately shows or proves nothing about how smooth the Z axis is just that you can turn the ballscrew and it moves, sorry) and premature wear of the bearings which will lead to a sloppy Z axis and inaccuracy. Jazz is being harsh (but perfectly fair) in his remarks, it's the way he is and he tells it like it is without any BS, he is one of (if not the) the most helpful and knowledgeable people on this forum and his comments are worth listening to, even if you don't like them.

    If you'd welded your Z axis and then had it machined so the bearing blocks could sit square, flat and true, and had the ballscrew mounting section machined flat/square and where the spindle is going to mount machined square to everything else then all this would be immaterial, but there's no way in hell that all this is going to be square with just plain welded steel. Yes you'll be able to use the machine but at what accuracy (you may not need much accuracy so this is all immaterial) and how long before the bearings wear and it all become loose and sloppy? The spindle will require lots of shimming to get it perpendicular but if your rails aren't straight/parallel and true then it'll still not cut accurately. How have you trammed the rails so they're parallel to each other, what equipment do you have (DTI's, levels, straight edges etc.) to check for straightness, parallelness etc?

    Whatever the outcome good luck with your build and I'm looking forward to seeing the first chips coming off this
    Hi mate,

    Thanks for the feedback. My measuring equipment consists of various levels, squares, straight edges rulers and a vernier caliper.

    I had considered the wear on the bearings and have endeavoured to set them as true as practical. Initially I screwed the middles in one spot of the rails then used the ballscrew brackets motion to guide it back and forward and held each side of the rails in place with rare earth magnets to get my parralell edges. Also the magnets edges set the line for squareness.

    I did need to reweld the old screwholes on 1 side and redrill new ones parralell to the other fully fastened side as it was quite a 'tough' fit and felt like there was more pressure towards the lower end when extending it. I've actually never spent this much time on one welding job ever. With more than 40 hours just in the Z axis alone. There is infact a tapering 0.8mm shim on the right side to get it so slick it wants to skate off in a breeze.

    As far as accuracy goes. If I can cut a rifle stock to my 3D design and all it needs is light sanding then I'm happy. I've been doing them by hand so far and getting one side the same as the other is near impossible. Also, spending 6 hours with a dremel digging the action channel is not fun.

    I don't have an issue with negative feedback, I just find it pointless and offensive when I see random posts that say "lucky you used round rail, profile rail wouldn't let you do that.". As I myself are not into BS, The pointless comparison between round rail and profile rail is unnecessary and not helpful.


    P.S I am taking full advantage of my round rails. I'm well aware that I can use the radial axes for giving me some room to play. :)

    Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Slixxor View Post
    Anyway, I'm sure that in ever experienced CNC loving life of yours you can stifle your vomit long enough to calmy ask questions and then make assumptions.

    Sincerely, non American but in fact Australian novice CNC builder. :)
    Argh your aussie I missed that and do apologise but should have known as it makes sense now.!! . . . Arrogant bastard.!

    Has for the rest there's been no assuming on my part because like I said before it's plane to see, even if you can't. Sorry if you think I'm being unhelpful but others did try but your Arrogant attitude wouldn't listen so thought maybe shock tactics would work better.? I would have gone onto the helpful stuff but to grant your wish I'll keep my unhelp self from offering any advise. However I will still chip in if needed just for the sake of others so they don't make same mistakes.!!

    G'day Mate.!!

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by JAZZCNC View Post
    Argh your aussie I missed that and do apologise but should have known as it makes sense now.!! . . . Arrogant bastard.!

    Has for the rest there's been no assuming on my part because like I said before it's plane to see, even if you can't. Sorry if you think I'm being unhelpful but others did try but your Arrogant attitude wouldn't listen so thought maybe shock tactics would work better.? I would have gone onto the helpful stuff but to grant your wish I'll keep my unhelp self from offering any advise. However I will still chip in if needed just for the sake of others so they don't make same mistakes.!!

    G'day Mate.!!
    friendly enough for me... you can Stay JAZZCNC :)

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Similar Threads

  1. BUILD LOG: Desktop size steel welded router 3 axis
    By Tom J in forum DIY Router Build Logs
    Replies: 84
    Last Post: 28-03-2017, 09:36 PM
  2. Z-axis huge slack / beginning a conversion
    By diy-john in forum Gantry/Router Machines & Building
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-03-2012, 10:26 PM
  3. Precision metal processing (3 axis, 5 axis, 7 axis) OEM
    By 7AxisCNC in forum Manufacturer News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17-05-2011, 02:04 PM
  4. CONVERSION: Buget Warco Major 5 axis conversion
    By Tweaky in forum Conversion Build Logs
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 07-10-2010, 04:26 PM
  5. Ron Steele Mini Lathe CNC Conversion - Z Axis Leadscrew?
    By No1_sonuk in forum Lead Screws, Nuts & Supports
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-05-2010, 12:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •